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Author Topic: Shimming runners  (Read 10743 times)
dnus4925
Newbie

Posts: 35


« on: December 23, 2015, 10:20:07 PM »

I've got a new plank, and my reference set of runners (using a dial caliper) come out to .002 toe in, I have another set of runners that come to less than .001 toe in. My question is, What is good for shimming? Does Kapton tape work? The thinnest I see with the adhesive is .0022. I know it comes in different thicknesses. I have used 3/4 oz glass wetted out, but that comes to about.005.  But with some glue, that comes to about .007. What do other people use?
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Bob Rast DN1313
Newbie

Posts: 148



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« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2015, 08:27:03 AM »

Plus or minus .001 to .002 probably not enough to worry about
When I see top sailors using scopes or triangles with string on the ice
Maybe just some epoxy and sand to your specifications
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Bob Gray
Class Member
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Posts: 193


« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2015, 08:39:41 AM »

 I too wouldn't worry much about a couple of thousands but if you want shim stock you can make your own. Go to a hobby shop and buy some thin fiberglass sheets. While you're there get some Super Glue and a activator like Insta-Set. Place a piece of the fiberglass on a piece of wax paper, saturate it with super glue, squeeze it smooth and give it a shot of Insta-Set. You now have a sheet of shim stock that you can cut up and super glue it to your runners. If it's not thick enough, glue another piece over it. If it's too thick, sand it down. Believe it or not these shims last a long time, I've got some plates that have been shimmed like this for years.
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Ken Smith
ADMIN

Posts: 289


sail often, travel light


« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2016, 09:48:28 AM »

I agree with Bob. You are good now. I too would rather paint on a little epoxy Witt filler graphite powder or cabosil, then sand it down with 150 grit on a metal sanding block. Per ant fix.

That small a misalignment is within measuring tolerance. One light pass on one side with a sharpening machine will change the edge more than that.
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Ken Smith
DN4137US
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