steering slop

<< < (2/3) > >>

petej33:
I had the same problem and followed the steps listed in Jeffs (Paul Goodwins) post, and it worked great.  The problem arose again, and I found that my sarns steering chalk was wider than 1 inch, solved this with shim tape on the steering runner and tightening that chalk bolt really tight. All was great until it happened one more time and I found that my aluminum steer tube that is attached to the steering head, the bolt holes were worn and ovaled  so i replaced that.

Its always something, start with Jeffs post, once that steering head is solid you should be good, or at least if its still loose its something simple.

JOHN BUSHEY:
If you go the glue route, don't leave the roll pin out.  If the glue does break loose, you need something to keep the joint from slipping a whole bunch, which could be unpleasant at speed.

DN 805:
The issue may not be slop in the system.
If the chock is not mounted vertical,  as the spring moves the chock up and down over bumps the overall length of the steering system changes and triggers wiggle at the tiller end of the system.   Most noticeable the faster the boat is moving and the rougher the ice.
The bearing tube may need to be re-positioned in the nose of the hull.

Geoff Sobering:
Quote from: DN 805 on February 07, 2017, 01:21:15 PM

The issue may not be slop in the system.
If the chock is not mounted vertical,  as the spring moves the chock up and down over bumps the overall length of the steering system changes ...


I'd not thought of that!
I have a (very slight) forward rake in my steering chock post. I'll have to check to see how big the effect is.

One other thing I forgot to mention: the quickest fix is to replace the roll-pin (unless there is a lot of deformation in the hole).
All you need is a new pin; you can push the old one out by tapping the new one in.
I probably still have some in my "on the ice" tools/parts kit because I would regularly only notice the problem once I was out at the course well away from the pits.

DN 805:
If it is determined that the issue is with the angle of the front chock, a quick and easy solution is to have a really stiff spring.  The ride may be bumpier, but more positive steering.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page