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Author Topic: steering slop  (Read 1752 times)
dnus4925
Newbie

Posts: 34


« on: February 05, 2017, 07:01:52 PM »

I'v noticed that there is some "slop" in my steering. This is very noticeable downwind at high speed. I have checked the chock post as well as the tiller post. They appear to have no slop or wear. The steering rod and ends are new and appear tight.
Any suggestions as to how to make it less, or eliminate it?
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Bob Gray
Class Member
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Posts: 181


« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2017, 07:18:43 AM »

Make sure your tiller fits tight on the square tube
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JOHN BUSHEY
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Posts: 26


« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2017, 10:53:05 AM »

Clamp the end of your tiller to a side board and wiggle the steering chock.  May help to have a runner in.   Look for looseness all along the load path.  Common spots are the obvious such rod end bearings and bolts on the steering rod, but less easy to see are the bushings in the steering posts, both the tiller and runner end.   One that is hard to see is the tiller fitting on the tiller post.  It is not unusual to find that the roll pin is loose in the post and it is very hard to see motion there.  If you don't find looseness anywhere else, that is probably the trouble.
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Geoff Sobering
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« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2017, 04:14:10 PM »

I second John's guess of a loose roll-pin. Before I glued my tiller-head onto the shaft I probably replaced the pin once a year.

A good discussion from a few years ago: http://dnamerica.org/forum/index.php?topic=990.0

Cheers,

Geoff S.
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Man Why You Even Got to Do a Thing
dnus4925
Newbie

Posts: 34


« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2017, 07:55:09 PM »

Thanks for the suggestions and the links!! This forum is excellent for suggestions and ideas. It pays to go back and reread sections
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petej33
Newbie

Posts: 30



« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2017, 04:41:53 AM »

I had the same problem and followed the steps listed in Jeffs (Paul Goodwins) post, and it worked great.  The problem arose again, and I found that my sarns steering chalk was wider than 1 inch, solved this with shim tape on the steering runner and tightening that chalk bolt really tight. All was great until it happened one more time and I found that my aluminum steer tube that is attached to the steering head, the bolt holes were worn and ovaled  so i replaced that.

Its always something, start with Jeffs post, once that steering head is solid you should be good, or at least if its still loose its something simple.
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US 5633
JOHN BUSHEY
Class Member
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Posts: 26


« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2017, 11:05:33 AM »

If you go the glue route, don't leave the roll pin out.  If the glue does break loose, you need something to keep the joint from slipping a whole bunch, which could be unpleasant at speed.
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DN 805
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Posts: 266


« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2017, 01:21:15 PM »

The issue may not be slop in the system.
If the chock is not mounted vertical,  as the spring moves the chock up and down over bumps the overall length of the steering system changes and triggers wiggle at the tiller end of the system.   Most noticeable the faster the boat is moving and the rougher the ice.
The bearing tube may need to be re-positioned in the nose of the hull.
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Geoff Sobering
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« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2017, 01:27:07 PM »

The issue may not be slop in the system.
If the chock is not mounted vertical,  as the spring moves the chock up and down over bumps the overall length of the steering system changes ...

I'd not thought of that!
I have a (very slight) forward rake in my steering chock post. I'll have to check to see how big the effect is.

One other thing I forgot to mention: the quickest fix is to replace the roll-pin (unless there is a lot of deformation in the hole).
All you need is a new pin; you can push the old one out by tapping the new one in.
I probably still have some in my "on the ice" tools/parts kit because I would regularly only notice the problem once I was out at the course well away from the pits.
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Man Why You Even Got to Do a Thing
DN 805
Class Member
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Posts: 266


« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2017, 03:57:43 PM »

If it is determined that the issue is with the angle of the front chock, a quick and easy solution is to have a really stiff spring.  The ride may be bumpier, but more positive steering.
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dnus4925
Newbie

Posts: 34


« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2017, 11:13:57 AM »

Thanks for all the advice. I took the steering apart last night and discovered that the pin the problem. I will replace the pin and epoxy the tiller head on.
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